nîtisânak (PDF)

$9.99

By Jas M. Morgan

Winner of the 2019 Writers’ Trust of Canada Dayne Ogilvie Prize for LGBTQ Emerging Writers
Winner of the 2019 Quebec Writers’ Federation Concordia University First Book Prize

2019 Quebec Writers’ Federation Mavis Gallant Prize for Non-Fiction, Finalist
2019 Indigenous Voices Award for Published Prose in English, Finalist
31st Annual Lambda Literary Awards for Lesbian Biography/Memoir, Finalist

Jas M. Morgan’s nîtisânak honours blood and chosen kin with equal care. A groundbreaking memoir spanning nations, prairie punk scenes, and queer love stories, it is woven around grief over the loss of their mother. It also explores despair and healing through community and family, and being torn apart by the same. Using cyclical narrative techniques and drawing on their Cree, Saulteaux, and Métis ancestral teachings, this work offers a compelling perspective on the connections that must be broken and the ones that heal.

Also available from Apple Books and in print.

Category:

Author: Jas M. Morgan
Press kit
Price: $9.99 CAD
ISBN: 978-0-9940471-8-2

Cover image by Dayna Danger

  • PDF
  • 200 pages

“[The author]’s incredible insight, unblinking frankness, and surprising tenderness combine to create an unforgettable voice. Razor-sharp critique and heartbreaking empathy are often juxtaposed throughout the book, creating the sort of nuanced cultural commentary that has been missing from Canada’s publishing landscape.”
—Alicia Elliott, Montreal Review of Books

“[The author] writes about: queer love and betrayal, the unexpected death of their white adoptive mother, being a prairie punk, the complex intersections of queer and Indigenous identities, and living in different parts of the prairies and the world, and more. It’s funny, sad, clever, tender, and biting. It’s fun to read, and profound and heartbreaking.”
Casey the Lesbrarian

nîtisânak is wildly interesting, thoughtful, and tender, but also utterly uncompromising. [The author] sees through the needs of a hungry audience who may have come to this queer Indigenous memoir to be titillated or scandalized and gently refuses.”
—Jessie Loyer, Capilano Review